TA ACSL Junior Division Theory - Contest Years 2001-02 through 2021-22



Schedules

ACSL Theory _Mon


Algebra is a branch of mathematics that substitutes letters for numbers. Algebra is about finding the unknown or putting real-life variables into equations and then solving them. Algebra can include real and complex numbers, matrices, and vectors
Monday
06:00 PM EDT - 07:00 PM EDT  

FULL
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TA ACSL Junior Division Theory-Contest Years 2001-02 through 2022-23


Suitable for elementary, junior and even senior high school students. Course consists of computer science basics and computer programming like data structure, Boolean algebra,bit-string flicking, recursive functions etc with varying content for each level.
Sunday
12:00 PM EDT - 01:00 PM EDT  

2 Spots Open
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TA ACSL Junior Division Theory - Contest Years 2001-2022


Talent Academy ACSL junior Division Theory 2001-2022 that recognizes the misconceptions during preparation and develops it on American computer science league. Each academic season is divided into four contests, testing students on fundamental concepts in computer science, ranging from a number system to Boolean Algebra to Digital Electronics. Providing an appropriate challenge for students of varying ages and abilities. ACSL organizes programming and computer science contest for K-12 students. The American computer science league is unique to its pattern and provides training to all k-12 students.



What Does This Program Do
This code first initializes three variables: A, NUM, and T. The first for loop traverses through A in reverse order and stores the reverse of A into T. The next for loop checks for if the character at index J in A is the same as the character at index J in T; if they are the same, then NUM increments by 1. So, this is what we have. A is BANANAS. After the for loop, T becomes SANANAB. These two strings' characters are compared to each other. All of the characters besides the first and last ones are the same. So, NUM increments up to 5. Our final answer is 5.

Prefix, Postfix, & Infix
some areas of computer science (such as compiler design), it makes much more sense to order expressions with prefix notation. In that case, the earlier example would be written as: +AB. The operator, +, precedes (comes before) the operands hence it is called prefix notation. Doesn't it really make sense to know first what operation that you will be computing so that you can sort of get ready for the right kind of problem and then to be told what the two values are. Prefix notation is sometimes called Polish notation because it was created by Jan Lukasiwicz. Sometimes computer scientists use postfix notation. With postfix notation, you place the operator AFTER the operands so the example above would be written as: AB+. Postfix notation is sometimes called Reverse Polish notation. Note that prefix (or Polish notation) is sometimes called RPN which stands for Registered Parameter Numbers

Computer Number Systems
All computers do the amazing things that they do by simply manipulating ones and zeros. Computers can only do binary (base 2) arithmetic. You must be able to use the binary number system in order to appreciate how the computer works. Since the computer works with the binary number system and since it is relatively easy to convert hexadecimal (base 16) and octal numbers (base 8) into binary, computer scientists need to be familiar with the octal and hexadecimal number systems.
To convert a decimal number into a base other than 10
Write out the powers in the other base starting at the power of 0 until you reach a number higher than the given number.
Divide the highest power of the base that can divided at least once into the given number.
Put the quotient of that division into a column that will eventually be the leftmost digit of the final answer.
Continue steps 2 & 3 using the remainder of the previous division but add each successive quotient to the right of previous quotients in the final answer.


Each academic season is divided into four contests, testing students on fundamental concepts in computer science, ranging from a number system to Boolean Algebra to Digital Electronics. Providing an appropriate challenge for students of varying ages and abilities. ACSL organizes programming and computer science contest for K-12 students. The American computer science league is unique to its pattern and provides training to all k-12 students.


Suitable for junior division Theory students. The course consists of computer science basics and computer programming like data structure, Boolean algebra, bit-string flicking, recursive functions, etc with varying content for each level.


Details : https://www.acsl.org/about
Student Guide :https://www.acsl.org/get-started/student-guide
Student Material :https://www.acsl.org/get-started/study-materials
ACSL Schedule :https://www.acsl.org/get-started/study-materials

    Contest #1: Completed on Dec 11 2021 @ 10.00 AM EST

    Contest #2: Completed on Feb 13 2022 @ 10:00 AM EST

    Contest #3: Completed on April 10 2022 @ 10:00 AM EST

    Contest #4: Coming Soon



Exercises

  • Decimal to Binary
  • Decimal to Hexadecimal
  • Octal to Decimal
  • Octal to Binary
  • Octal to Hexadecimal
  • Hexadecimal to Decimal
  • Hexadecimal to Binary
  • Hexadecimal to octal
  • Binary to Decimal
  • Binary to octal
  • Binary to Hexadecimal

Concepts

  • Evaluate Prefix
  • Evaluate Postfix
  • Prefix to postfix
  • Infix to Prefix
  • Infix to Postfix

  • Bit-String Flicking
  • Boolean Algebra
  • Computer Number Systems
  • Data Structures
  • Digital Electronics
  • Graph Theory
  • Prefix/Infix/Postfix Notation
  • Recursive Functions
  • What Does This Program Do?

What Does This Program Do

  • What Does This Program Do-Branching
  • What Does This Program Do-Loop
  • What Does This Program Do-Array
  • What Does This Program Do-Strings

2021-2022

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2020-2021

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2019-2020

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2018-2019

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2017-2018

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2016- 2017

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2015- 2016

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2014- 2015

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2013-2014

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2012-2013

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2011-2012

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2010-2011

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2009-2010

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2008-2009

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2007-2008

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2006-2007

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2005-2006

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2004-2005

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2003-2004

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2002-2003

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2001-2002

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest