TA ACSL Senior Division Theory - Contest Years 2001-02 through 2020-21


TA ACSL Senior Division Theory - Contest Years 2001-2021


ACSL arranges computer science and computer programming international tournaments for students in elementary, junior, and senior high school. Over 300 teams from the United States, Canada, Europe, Africa, and Asia are participating in various divisions this year, our 41st year of continuous operation. The National Association of Secondary School Principals has approved ASL as an activity (NASSP). ASL is also a member of the Computer Science Teachers Association as an institutional member. ACSL provides multiple numbers of contests from 2001-2021 Best for high school students with programming experience, especially those taking AP Computer Science. As we know In the United States, Advanced Placement Computer Science is a suite of Advanced Placement courses and examinations covering areas of computer science. They are offered by the College Board to high school students as an opportunity to earn college credit for college-level courses, but here we are helping you to learn this skill in the perfectionist way with the best educators.


Widely the topics covered in the curriculum are: Computer Number Systems, Recursive Functions, What does this program do? , Pre/Post/Infix Notation, Bit-String Flicking, LISP, Boolean Algebra, Data Structures, Finite State Automation (FSA)/Regular Expressions, Graph Theory, Digital Electronics, Assembly Language and many more such topics that are challenging and interesting to learn. All these topics covered in the curriculum are widely useful in the future career aspect. Boolean Algebra is one of the most widely seen topics throughout the contest. So all the previous year's question papers give a lot of practice and wide exposure to how the questions can be asked. This helps students to utilise their time correctly and effectively. Not only that by practicing for using the earlier question papers, but students also gain confidence and can perform extremely well. It has been seen based on the track record that students who utilize the modules correctly and efficiently then the results have been extremely good.


Junior/senior high school students having prior experience in computer programming, either Java or Python, and notably those enrolled in Computer Science AP course, compete in the Senior Division. Prior experience in the ACSL Intermediate or Junior Division is greatly recommended, but not required. Each month, the contest consists of a 30-minute, 5-question test held on the Academy of Programming (AOP) premises, as well as a take-home programming problem. We will help you to reach your goal in every possible way, we have the best online support, best educators, and teaching techniques that will make your life smooth and skillful. Each contest consists of an online 30-minute, 5-question short answer test and an online programming problem to solve in 72 hours. A time-bound contest that requires rigorous practice.


What exactly is ACSL? ASL hosts a computer science and programming competitions for kids in primary, middle, and high school. The National Association of Secondary School Principals[NASSP] has designated the American Computer Science League as an approved activity. What is the purpose of ACSL? For all computer fans, this is one-of-a-kind and thrilling educational experience. It would almost certainly look excellent on a resume if you were applying to a school. Students can use programming contests to improve their algorithmic problem-solving, data analytics, and programming skills in general. The ASCL competition encourages students to improve and compete in their math and reasoning skills, as well as to study computer areas that are not covered in their school's curriculum. Pre-Requisite? While there is no requirement to enter the ACSL competition, it is recommended that you start with the fundamentals. At the earliest possible opportunity, students must apply in the Talent Academy's foundational programming/flowchart courses, following which they might register in the ACSL previous years' module paper access modules, which provides a jump start and prepares you for the actual contest.



  • Assembly Language Programming
  • Bit-String Flicking
  • Boolean Algebra
  • Computer Number Systems
  • Data Structures
  • Digital Electronics
  • FSAs
  • Graph Theory
  • LISP
  • Prefix/Infix/Postfix Notation
  • Recursive Functions
  • What Does This Program Do?

Exercises

  • Decimal to octal
  • Decimal to Binary
  • Decimal to Hexadecimal
  • Octal to Decimal
  • Octal to Binary
  • Octal to Hexadecimal
  • Hexadecimal to Decimal
  • Hexadecimal to Binary
  • Hexadecimal to octal
  • Binary to Decimal
  • Binary to octal
  • Binary to Hexadecimal

2020-2021

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4

2019-2020

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2018-2019

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2017-2018

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2016-2017

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2015-2016

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2014-2015

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2013-2014

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2012-2013

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2011-2012

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2010-2011

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2009-2010

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2008-2009

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2007-2008

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2006-2007

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2005-2006

  • Contest 1
  • Contest2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest4
  • All-Star Contest

2004-2005

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2003-2004

  • Contest 1
  • Contest.2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2002-2003

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest

2001-2002

  • Contest 1
  • Contest 2
  • Contest 3
  • Contest 4
  • All-Star Contest